CIFF

Solas Nua presents the
17th Annual Capital Irish Film Festival

AFI Silver - CapiItal Irish Film Festival - IMG_3287

SAVE THE DATE

March 02 — 05
AFI Silver Theatre & Cultural Center in Silver Spring, MD. 

**Festival passes will be on sale in December**

Solas Nua's annual Capital Irish Film Festival, now in its 17th year, presents the best of contemporary Irish cinema by filmmakers from the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland to audiences in the D.C. metropolitan area. We are delighted to present the festival in partnership with the American Film Institute at their east coast home in the historic art deco Silver Theatre & Cultural Center, in Silver Spring, MD. 

The four day festival showcases the latest Irish dramatic and documentary features, shorts, art films and animation releases, and we accept official submissions via Film Freeway.  The 2023 festival will highlight  Irish language, social change, migration and Northern Ireland. We are delighted to feature Soilsiú Films’ Award-winning documentary Young Plato, an inspiring and uplifting documentary about a Northern Ireland School Principal’s efforts to interrupt the intergenerational trauma in the lives of his young pupils through the teaching of philosophy. We are excited to also introduce new programming strands including family oriented and experimental art films. 

In 2023 short filmmakers from or living in Northern Ireland will automatically be entered into the running for the Norman Houston Short Film Award - an annual honor for the best new short film created by a filmmaker based in or from Northern Ireland. The Norman Houston Short Film Award is part of the Norman Houston Project - a project initiated by Solas Nua in Washington D.C., dedicated to the memory of Norman Houston, the former Director of the Northern Ireland Bureau (NIB), in the United States. 

The Capital Irish Film Festival is supported by Culture Ireland, Screen Ireland, the Northern Ireland Bureau and the Embassy of Ireland.  

“The festival films showcase the full humanity of the Irish people. They are tough without being mean, forgiving without being saccharine. Quiet, deadpan humor is never far from their lips. These films are almost all a welcome reprieve from the D.C. grind.” 
— Washington City Paper